dR Daily 2/17/20: Is it Presidents or President's Day? and other pressing questions

So many questions about this most confusing of holidays:

• So is it “president’s” or “presidents?” Presidents, plural. Forget the apostrophe.

• And which presidents are we talking about exactly? Washington — his birthday is on Feb. 22 — and Lincoln, who was born Feb. 12. But it’s apparently now a custom to think of this as a celebration of all presidents, including the incumbent. You do you.

Will I be getting any mail? Nope.

Will my bank be open? Nope to that, too.

Schools? If you’re a parent and you don’t already know the answer to this one, good luck to you.

Trash pickup? Talk about confusing. In Hillsborough, the answer is yes. Same with Clearwater. In St. Pete? Nope. Go out and get that trash can you rolled to the curb.

A note on honoring presidents, specifically Mr. Lincoln: George Saunders’ novel Lincoln in the Bardo imagines the interior life of the president after the death of his young son. He is stricken with grief, but realizes in this passage that, even if he is suffering, he has a responsibility to others:

“His mind was freshly inclined toward sorrow; toward the fact that the world was full of sorrow; that everyone labored under some burden of sorrow; that all were suffering; that whatever way one took in this world, one must try to remember that all were suffering (none content; all wronged, neglected, overlooked, misunderstood), and therefore one must do what one could to lighten the load of those with whom one came into contact; that his current state of sorrow was not uniquely his, not at all, but, rather, its like had been felt, would be felt, by scores of others, in all times, in every time, and must not be prolonged or exaggerated, because, in this state, he could be of no help to anyone and, given that his position in the world situated him to be either of great help, or great harm, it would not do to stay low, if he could help it.”  ― George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo